Travis, You Are Awesome

I came across Travis CI this week, and it's awesome. I've got a bunch of tests for django-magazine, but I'm not very good at running them. It turns out that unit tests aren't very useful if you don't run them, so I wanted to make sure that every time I pushed code to it, the tests run. Enter Travis CI.

I Know Nothing

See, I know nothing! — Manuel I distinctly remember being 17 years old, I'd just finished re-launching a site for a charity I was involved with[1.Oxygen's site has gone through several versions since I moved away in 2004 to start university. The wonderful Wayback Machine has a cache of the site from around that time.], and I confidently declared that I knew all there was to know about building websites. And I believed it.

Getting Better at Testing

I started with unit testing about 4 years ago. I started writing what were probably integration tests, when I was working on the database backend of our application. The tests I wrote were designed to make sure that our process which saved data actually saved data.

Starting with Pelican

In about 1998, I was building a website for a friend. The site was entirely static. I'd already learned the hard way about the pain of trying to keep lots of separate static HTML files visually consistent.

Starting Over

Every once in a while, I want to start again. I currently have 6 different sites using Kaléo, a bit of software I wrote for managing Church websites, which I'll write about another time. The code is stored in a private git repository, and synced out to 6 different places every time I need to make a change.